If you’re into the raw food movement, you may have heard about a product called Adya Clarity. The people who are selling (and re-selling) this product are making some pretty amazing claims. And perhaps, like me, you’re wondering how much is hype and how much is genuine?

Here’s the story behind Adya Clarity and other black mica products as stated in an email promotion:

“In the 1960s, Dr. Asao Shimanishi, a noted scientist and doctor from Japan, discovered after decades of research, that the rock that contained the most abundant minerals is black mica.

Black mica (also known as biotite) is found in a wide variety of igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Dr. Shimanishi also discovered that the minerals he extracted from black mica rocks from north of Tokyo had a tremendous healing and nourishing power.  He invented a patented way to extract minerals from black mica and maintain them in an ionized form.  As a result, people who ate vegetables fertilized with the ionized water became healthier and rejuvenated.  This rejuvenative effect may well stem from the fact that the human body consists of the same foundational building blocks as black mica.

In Japan, Dr. Shimanishi is regarded as an authority on the treatment and cleaning of water.  He’s probably best known for healing entire bodies of water using a magnetic sulfate mineral solution extracted from the most mineral-rich black mica deposit in Mt Fuji, Japan.

He has demonstrated how he can easily take whole ponds or lakes that are filthy, murky and contaminated — and within one hour, transform the water, making it pristine, crystal clear and potable.  And the water would thereafter stay fresh and clean permanently because the contaminants never re-dissolve in water once the water is treated.

There’s a version of the magnetic sulfate mineral solution that Dr. Shimanishi designed for human consumption.  It’s called Black Mica Extract.  When you put a dropper full of the solution into a glass of tap water, you’ll see before your very eyes how the solution pulls the invisible toxins and contaminants from the water, gathering them together into larger-sized, visible particulates that are heavier than water, causing them to precipitate (sink) to the bottom of the glass.  Once the toxins and contaminants are extracted, they become inert substances that are rendered harmless, as well as insoluble, thereby preventing them from being re-absorbed by the water. In addition to cleaning the water and getting rid of all the heavy metals, the solution also remineralizes it with the highest quality minerals.”

Promoters say that when you use Adya Clarity (black mica extract – whatever that is; how do you make an extract from a rock?) daily, it de-calcifies the body, detoxes heavy metals, oxygenates the blood and eliminates Candida and bacteria. I’ve been following the promotion of this product for a while and have watched a number of videos about it and I must admit: I was sorely tempted to buy some and find out for myself what it can do. However, the product is extremely expensive. If you take it the way they advise (1 tsp in 1 oz of water daily for a month), the experiment would cost you about $150. If it worked it would be worth every penny, if not… doh!

So, before I took the plunge and plunked down my cash, I emailed Jim Haszinger – who manufacturers the nanoparticle minerals I have already written about extensively and which my whole family uses (see my latest formulations as well!) – to see if he had tested this product and what his thoughts are. He wrote back:

“The USA importer for this met with our small group of scientists, doctors, etc and I even bought a bunch of it to play with. It didn’t grab me then and no one I sold it to reordered, so it went to the wayside.”

Hmmmm…. If you’ve tried this product, leave me your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. Did it work for you? What results did you get? When assessing a new product I also ask myself: This product may help in certain ways, but does it work BETTER than protocols I already have? Let me know what you think and let’s pool our experience!

WHAT THE ADYA CLARITY PATENT REVEALS…

Big thank-you to LTD who posted the links to the patent application for black mica/Adya Clarity by inventor Asao Shimanishi. The patent application document answered a number of my questions, but also raised some important new ones. If you read through the patent document, you will see that my question of “How do they make an extract from a rock anyway?” is answered. They do it using sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid. As stated, this then results in a highly acidic product (Adya Clarity), so they caution NOT to use it at a concentration of more then 100 – 200 ppm (parts per million).

If you do, then they want you to add “lime water or a dilute caustic soda solution” to neutralize the pH of the water. As we all know, drinking acidic water (or other liquids or foods) is damaging to health in the long-term.

So that leaves me with my first big new question: Has anybody tested the concentration (ppm) of Adya Clarity that these “health gurus” are telling you to add to your water? Especially in the case of the ‘Adya Shots’ (talked about in the Kacper Postawski webinar) where they recommend 1 tsp in 1 ounce of water daily for a month. Just logically, it seems to me that would add up to more than 200 ppm (parts per million) of Adya Clarity in that 1 ounce of water… but without testing, we can’t know.

For this reason, I have to add a BIG WARNING to people with IBD or IBS: Be extremely careful if you use this highly acidic product. We know that even tiny amounts of Betaine Hydrochloric Acid (HCL) can trigger intestinal bleeding, so this product will likely have a similar action/effect on the digestive tract of sensitive individuals. The sellers of Adya Clarity are being misleading in this regard, positioning the product as a “mineral extract” – no one would assume that it is an acidic solution, because minerals are alkalizing, right? But yet, according to the product patent, black mica extract or  Adya Clarity, is a highly acidic solution, so acidic that anything over 200 ppm can acidify the water and you need to add alkalizing agents to bring the water back to a pH of 7 or higher.

The other issue the patent application raised for me was that of water filtration/safety. The promoters and seller of Adya Clarity and other black mica extracts are telling people that it’s all you need to use to purify any water from any source (rivers, lakes, tap, etc.). However, the inventors of this product state very clearly in the patent application that the mica mineral reagent is only one step in the water purification process and that you also need to:

a) Filter the water first with a “filtering chamber” to remove large or visible debris

b) Then an active charcoal filtration layer is needed to remove anions and a vermion filtration layer is needed to remove cations, “Such ions include cations of ammonia, calcium, manganese, or ions of chlorine, fluorine, nitric acid and nitrous acid”.

c) Lastly, the black mica (Adya Clarity) is added to “insolubulize organic materials dissolved in sewage and sterilize bacteria”.

So, this is a very important distinction to keep in mind: That Adya Clarity on its own is NOT sufficient to sterilize water from all sources – according to the inventor of the product.

Kacper Postawski – one of the promoters of Adya Clarity has a Facebook ad running that claims that Adya Clarity can remove fluoride (when fluorine has bonded to other elements) from your drinking water, but in the patent document it states that the vermion (from vermiculite) filtration layer is needed to remove fluorine from the water.

Please be aware that this is not a self-righteous diatribe against the latest health scam – in all likelihood Kacper Postawski, Matt Monarch, etc. have not examined the original patents for this product (marketed as Enminera in Japan) but are repeating information given to them from someone they trusted.

I have even had suppliers forge and falsify documents to try to convince me of claims that went against my common sense – so we are all susceptible to being misled and I am not judging anyone here – Lord knows I may be next! It’s very hard to stay on top of all the latest research and conflicting information in the health sector – which is why I love this interactive blog format. We have people contributing their knowledge and research from a large pool, instead of just relying on one or two people – which is extremely helpful for those of us trying to get a handle on what’s true and what’s not!

IMPORTANT UPDATE – DO NOT CONSUME ADYA CLARITY (Oct.28/11)

Mike Adams (The Health Ranger) on his mega-site, Natural News.com, just posted the worrying results of his conversation with the owner and importer of Adya Clarity (Matt Bakos) along with his detailed investigation into the ingredients of Adya Clarity. You simply must read Adams’ article: NaturalNews issues consumer alert about Adya Clarity, imported as battery acid and sold for internal consumption, if you are considering buying or ingesting Adya Clarity.

In his article, Adams details how Adya Clarity is imported as ‘battery acid,’ does not disclose on the label the very high (1200 ppm) aluminum content of the product, and finally answers a point raised many times in the comments section of this blog about the mechanism behind the miraculous way Adya Clarity pulls all the orangey-colored stuff out of the water to the bottom of the glass. Adams also raises valid points about the high iron content in the product.

From my side, I don’t trust the labeling on this product at all now. I would still like to see someone (with enough cash to do it – Adams? Mercola?) get an independent lab assay done on this product to see what ELSE it contains and whether the amounts stated on the label are even correct? Also, is there a substantial variance in levels and ingredients from batch to batch?

I will also have to go on record and agree with Mike Adams – in my opinion, this does not look like a safe, nor beneficial product to ingest. And I sure wouldn’t take it myself!

As many people have pointed out in the hundreds of excellent comments following this blog post, there are many other tried and tested ways to cure what ails you – kidney stones, decalcification, detox, arthritis, etc. – with a long history of use and some solid, independent science to back them up.

For me, as someone who has worked in holistic health for over a decade, and who also formulates health care products, this kind of mis-labeling, junk science and scamming of desperate people is very upsetting. This is the kind of product the FDA points to when it wants to justify making it harder and more expensive for supplement companies to provide you with non-drug solutions. So Bakos is not just harming himself by this kind of con-job, he is harming everyone else in the natural health industry; from the consumer to the manufacturer.

After first posting this inquiry, I was contacted by someone who wanted to talk to me privately about Adya Clarity. Apparently, he was one of the first people approached to sell/distribute Adya Clarity. But, like Mike Adams, when he started asking too many questions, the owner got upset and dropped him cold.

SO WHY ALL THE GOOD REPORTS ABOUT ADYA CLARITY?

As anyone who works in healthcare knows – whether medical or holistic – the single most powerful healing agent known to humanity is the mind, or belief (visceral, gut-level knowledge or conviction) of the person. This is not a dismissal of someone’s reality, or a belittling of their Healing Journey, it is simply a statement of fact. See Dr. Bruce Lipton’s book, The Biology of Belief for the in-depth science behind this.

So, if someone believes with all their heart that Adya Clarity will work miracles (as claimed in the webinars, videos and websites promoting it) and their body zings with hope and anticipation that finally, FINALLY they can get relief, they can begin to heal… They have already mobilized the most powerful forces of their immune system and healing mechanism before the first drop even passes their lips.

The other dynamic that is undoubtedly at work here (and this has been mentioned several times in the comments section under this blog post) is the amazing health benefits conferred simply by just drinking enough water each and every day. However, you are not just drinking water, you are drinking water imbued with all the positivity, hope, love and excitement of your conviction about Adya Clarity’s miraculous effects. See Masaru Emoto’s books for the science behind how water molecules change shape to reflect our energy or intention.

Lastly, when flooded with either something new, something different, or something challenging, the body can respond in a positive way, again, simply from the body’s own mobilization of its own healing forces. This sounds very simplistic, but medical science has long identified this mechanism, hence why “go home and take an aspirin”, or even just a visit to the doctor’s office, can often work wonders. Somehow, it flips a switch and nothing really needs to be done, or ingested, you just need to wait and the body will heal itself in a short period of time.

So, basically, this whole Adya Clarity mess just points again to why we really need to both listen to our gut AND do our research. It reminds me of the whole bacterial soil organism muddle – kicked off with Garden of Life and now continued with Prescript Assist. Junk science, miraculous effects, but what are the side effects? And then what happens to all the the poor people with adverse reactions, infections etc. and how the heck do you get rid of all those spores you ingested now anyway?

As my dear brother, Ricken Patel (founder of Avaaz.org) recently wrote to me: “Reason without emotion would be lifeless. Reason without intuition would be aimless. But intuition without reason can be dangerous, and emotion without reason can be foolish. So I’ve found that wisdom is the *harmony* of intuition, reason, and emotion. With none as master, and none as servant.”

So, as I said, when trying new health products, listen to your gut, but also do your research!


Original post August 2011. Most recently updated September 2019.